Walking Videos

Deliberate Walking

Just the Feet

This video provides an extended display of Deliberate Walking with images focused on the lower limbs (feet). Notice ground contact is made with the mid-foot and heel-off occurs as or right before the swing foot passes the stance foot.

INFO

This video provides an extended display of Deliberate Walking with images focused on the lower limbs (feet). Notice ground contact is made with the mid-foot and heel-off occurs as or right before the swing foot passes the stance foot.

HEEL-TOE WALKING

Heel-toe Walking (HTW)

INFO

The HTW video displays walking that is familiar to moderns who wear shoes (shod walking). HTW is considered “normal.” HTW utilizes a longer-stride than barefoot (unshod) walking. Initial ground contact is made with the rear-foot (heel) instead of the mid-foot or fore-foot.

Heel-toe Walking (HTW)

INFO

The heel-toe walking (HTW) video displays walking that is familiar to moderns who wear shoes (shod walking). HTW is considered “normal.” HTW utilizes a longer-stride than barefoot (unshod) walking. Initial ground contact is made with the rear-foot (heel) instead of the mid-foot or fore-foot.

DELIBERATE WALKING

Deliberate Walking (DW)

INFO

The Deliberate Walking (DW) video displays walking that is unfamiliar to people who wear shoes (shod walking). Humans were born to walk with natural walking (NW). NW and habitual barefoot walking (HBW) are the same. HBW is different than shod HTW. DW is biomechanically different than HTW as it resembles and simulates HBW with shoes. DW utilizes a shorter-stride than HTW walking. Initial ground contact is made with the mid-foot or fore-foot, instead of the rear-foot (heel). Heel-off occurs much sooner during the stance phase of shod DW compared with shod HTW.

Deliberate Walking (DW)

INFO

The Deliberate Walking (DW) video displays walking that is unfamiliar to moderns who wear shoes (shod walking). Humans were born to walk with natural walking (NW). NW and habitual barefoot walking (HBW) are the same. HBW is different than shod HTW. DW is biomechanically different than HTW as it resembles and simulates HBW with shoes. DW utilizes a shorter-stride than HTW walking. Initial ground contact is made with the mid-foot or fore-foot, instead of the rear-foot (heel). Heel-off occurs much sooner during the stance phase of shod DW compared with shod HTW.

TINY STEPS

Tiny-steps Walking (TSW)

INFO

The Tiny-steps Walking (TSW) video displays Deliberate Walking (DW) on ice with an exceptionally shortened stride length. TSW facilitates DW instruction and learning. Notice the upright (straight) body posture above the waist, the knees remain slightly bent (flexed) through the stance phase of walking, ground (ice) contact is made with the mid-foot and stance foot heel-off occurs as or right before the swing foot passes the stance foot.

TODDLER WALKING

Toddler Walking Barefoot

INFO

This video displays a toddler walking without shoes who has been walking for a week. Notice how initial ground contact is made with the fore-foot. Adult heel-toe walking is considered “normal,” however, this manner of walking is absent in toddlers learning to walk. Clinicians and researchers believe that toddlers walk initially with a fore-foot because their a brain and central nervous system is developmentally immature. As the brain and nervous system maturates walking is believed to change from a fore-foot strike to a heel-strike.

Toddler Walking with Shoes

INFO

This video displays a toddler walking with shoes, the same day as the previous video. Notice the dramatic change in walking with shoes. The foot makes initial ground contact with the mid-foot instead of the fore-foot. Does this immediate change in walking represent instantaneous brain and central nervous system maturation or a walking adjustment to accommodate shoes? The toddler is adjusting their walking to accommodate shoes.

RUNNING ON ICE

Running - Forefoot Strike

INFO

This video displays running on ice with fore-foot ground (ice) contact. The foot makes ice contact with the fore-foot directly under the body’s center of mass (COM). This foot placement is a more stable position. Running with a rear-foot strike is common in shod runners, but uncommon in barefoot runners. Humans were born to run with a fore-foot strike instead of a rear-foot (heel) strike. Running on ice facilitates the proper running technique used by habitual barefoot runners.

Running - Heel Strike

INFO

This video displays running on ice with fore-foot ground (ice) contact. The foot makes ice contact with the fore-foot directly under the body’s center of mass (COM). This foot placement is a more stable position. Running with a rear-foot strike is common in shod runners, but uncommon in barefoot runners. Humans were born to run with a fore-foot strike instead of a rear-foot (heel) strike. Running on ice facilitates the proper running technique used by habitual barefoot runners.